To block or not to block that is the question?

As you may be aware I am crocheting this scarf for my friend. I have crocheted 67 cm since my last post. Because I am doing a chevron pattern, it will kind of ripple and rib together like so.

To flatten or stretch out – as you can see that I have already done on the stripe – You will need a padded surface (i.e. ironing board, mattress, foam mats, etc), pins and a spray bottle. I use a towel so that my ironing board doesn’t get too wet.

2014-11-11 16.49.59I lay out my work and pin them every few cm, be careful not stretch too much or use not enough pins otherwise you will end up with a scalloped edge.

 

2014-11-11 16.51.16Using a spray bottle filled with cold work, completely spray your work with water and let it dry. You can either let it air dry or speed up the process with a heat gun.

 

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Once your work has dried, you can unpin it and now your work is flat, and it looks like that you crochet or knitted your piece of work perfectly.

Bright and Bold Scarf

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My latest project is this bright and bold scarf that a good friend of my mine requested. This is the progress that I have made on it so far. I am using a chevron pattern found at meetmeatmikes. Yarn used is from Bendigo Woollen Mills, from the Stellar range Red Coral and Amethyst and from the luxury range Tangerine and Cerise.

Upcycling T-shirts

 

One day while I was trolling the Internet for my next crochet project, looking for inspiration. I had the thought of making myself a crochet beach skirt, which then I stumbled upon Katrinshine’s Etsy Shop, where I saw her wonderful t-shirts and tanks.

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I thought that it was a great idea, and then I thought, I have some old shirts that I could try this on, that I didn’t care if I ruined, but I could wear if I succeeded. So I googled some more and found that she had a tutorial of how to make these shirts on her blog. I read it through, and realised that I could attempt to make one, all I needed was a crocheted doily to attach to a shirt.

I found this great pinwheel doily pattern, which after reading through the pattern was easy and it was a good size. I used a 1.5mm steel crochet hook and the colour Snow from the Cotton range at Bendigo Woollen Mills.

After I completed the doily, I blocked it so it would be flat and then realised some of my mistakes on my doily, but then figured that no one would noticeĀ  them. I followed the tutorial and made my own upcycled doily back t-shirt, and I was pleased with the result.

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Chervon Baby Blanket

I have finally finished my 2nd baby blanket that I have ever crocheted. I am quite happy with the end product.

I made this blanket using yarn that I purchased from Bendigo Woollen Mills from their Athena range, the colours that I used were Ivory, Ice Blue, Mint, Petal and Heather. I love the blend in this yarn, it has a mixture of wool, bamboo and silk. its soft and yet the provides the warmth that comes from wool. The other good thing about this yarn is that it is machine washable, which is great, as it makes it practical as a baby blanket.

Having crocheted two baby blankets now, it has inspired me to create, make and share my projects.

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Baby Checks Blanket

My first crocheted baby blanket completed. This one has taken me about 2 months but I did make some other items in between when I started this blanket and when I finished.

This blanket I used yarn purchased from Bendigo Woollen Mills from the Classic range. The colours used were Almond, Maize, Celery and Lilac. I love the colour combination.

The pattern that I used can be found at Red Heart.

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Scarves and Cowls!

So I have been busy lately knitting and crocheting scarves and cowls as it is winter now.

 

The cowl pattern can be found at http://thecrochetcrowd.com/mobius-scarf/

And the crochet scarf pattern can be found at http://www.meladorascreations.com/mesh-stitch-crochet-scarf-free-crochet-pattern/ – I had altered this pattern just by having the number of stitches on the first chain to make a scarf half the width.